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  • Mainly about engagement and collaboration using social media and events, with some asides on living in London. More about David Wilcox and also how the blog started.
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The conclusion to the report sets out six giants to slay. The most inetersting is "Mental Aptitude" which is not only a key driver for individuals, it can be a key barrier for whole communities.

Thanks Nick - the Demos approach was clearly a big step towards creating a different mental space to imagine/envision regeneration (oops jargon). It looks as if - for whatever reasons - people slipped back into the old spaces at the end. Maybe they should have tried a social media press release, because of the faults of the old type

Congratulations to Glasgow for wishing to encourage a vision for the city in 2020.

Addiction, worklessness, health, homes and other such basics of a decent life are where I guess they will be targeting future resources. The city has been trying for 50 years to tackle this list and I don't really think the Demos input has contributed much.

Pride in their place will help, but most folk would like a decent house, a job and to be free from the social ills.

It sounds like Demos invited the response that they got by taking their egos, rather than the Council as their client.

The manual with the cover that reads 'how to change regeneration minds' is full of the need to be pragmatic and create the conditions in which 'conceptualizers' and 'implementers' coalesce.

From the fallout it seems that, despite some of Demos' great ideas, the local principals didn't learn much from those with a more panoramic view.

There is a massive imagination deficit in urban regeneration in the U.K. But then many aspects of our lives lack imagination because markets don't demand it and people don't value it.

If regeneration is about creating a new, differentiated proposition, imagination matters.

But if it's about making poor people better off, does imagination really matter? Or is motivation, empathy and pragmatism more important?

David Barrie said:

"If regeneration is about creating a new, differentiated proposition, imagination matters.

But if it's about making poor people better off, does imagination really matter?"

I wonder if this is describing a gap between micro innovation at local level and ambition and imagination at the macro level. Most of what government needs to do is somewhere in between, and aggregating all that micro innovation and matching it to a big ambition is a process too complex for bureaucracies to handle?

Nick writes:

"I wonder if this is describing a gap between micro innovation at local level and ambition and imagination at the macro level."

Really true. One problem is that middle-up vehicles are few and far between. And if they're invented, they tend to be marketing, rather than innovation-led. Demos' report is a bold-attempt to bridge or engage with the gap but for some reason a disconnect is laid bare; one side ends up looking narcissist, the other parochial.

But the value of the in-between must hold true. and surely worth plugging away at.

I've blogged on this a bit here -

http://davidbarrie.typepad.com/david_barrie/2007/05/post.html

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