ABOUT

  • Mainly about engagement and collaboration using social media and events, with some asides on living in London. More about David Wilcox and also how the blog started.
  • Search

    WWW
    http://partnerships.typepad.com/civic/

« Social housing explores social media | Main | Evaluating participation, amidst political realities »

Comments

I like this a lot, David. I just reorganized an entire training session to end up this way, where the participants will create their own handouts because I think that the more engaged people are in creating actual work product, the better off they are. Sometimes the challenge has been getting them to actually do the work. As a trainer, they expect me to just feed them the information and depending on the group, can get pretty crabby about not just being able to sit back and listen to me yammer on.

I think it's fabulous to see this kind of thinking about how to end a workshop.

Won't work for every situation, but for events where participants are already knowledgeable and ready to tell their stories, and willing to learn from each other, this is a terrific idea!

Interesting mixture of construction and deconstruction. Probably one of a range of mix and match opportunites that new media will bring forward will bring forward for all sorts of organisations. Thanks for shairing that on the wider web.

I like the idea. Forgive the colour of my critique. I didn't like the product - death by powerpoint reaches out its menacing mandibles. And I couldn't relate to the 'content', tho' I realise I'm not supposed to.

But I also thought that you'd been doing this for sometime David. On a weekly basis I observe that you come back from a conference/meeting or workshop, write a pithy review, reflect on it, include a pic, link to some talking heads and then have a chat about it via comments now and again.

Now that's got the juice of interactivity in it.

I saw Matt's original blog item listing the results of the workshop, but it wasn't until he Skyped me with a link to the presentations produced by the people there that it clicked.
I'm delighted (for Matt) that the idea has caught people's interest, and with the comments (thanks folks) given me a nudge to think how new media opens up new ways of doing things. More ideas please!

The comments to this entry are closed.