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  • Mainly about engagement and collaboration using social media and events, with some asides on living in London. More about David Wilcox and also how the blog started.
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And (I believe) you can learn how to improve relations with your neighbours - http://neighbourhoods.typepad.com/neighbourhoods/2005/06/the_future_of_n.html.
I daresay there is already research confirming that many people who game online already know one another and meet face-to-face?
k

There is some evidence, which Jo alluded to, that gamers back-up their online communities with real life meets etc..

There's also, and I think this is where this gets interesting, a body of work that talks about how people represent themselves online in these communities, and how this differs from how they represent themselves in real life.

Lots of research has gone on into how people represent themselves in face-to-face deliberations (whether at planning meetings or discussions of the future of cloning, say, where, eg they may try to posture themselves to be the expert) and there's some work going on into online deliberations. And I think I'm right in saying that people often feel more open online than face-to-face or by phone, because of the different meeting dynamics.

Where I think Jo's point gets exciting is if we could combine some sort of representative deliberation in comfortable digital environments and apply them to tricky issues that affect young people.

Technical programmers bring a new approach to complexity that allows them to critique non-techical processes very well. There's no reason why gamers can't do the same (speaking as a non-gamer, I might add...)

You said:

"Where I think Jo's point gets exciting is if we could combine some sort of representative deliberation in comfortable digital environments and apply them to tricky issues that affect young people."

I think this is absolutely right. Where new solutions can be about adding to the sum of human knowledge and providing new evidence, they are bound to be worth exploring.

I was particularly interested in the way this discussion was focussed on deliberation, and not the usual sterile ground of how like-minded individuals can be networked and can use new communications tools to campaign.


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